Friday, November 30, 2012

Be careful of adding debugging, as microseconds count..

.. after tinkering with the TDMA code a bit more, I discovered why I was seeing larger swings in the TDMA slot timings.

Two words: Debug Code.

Well, to be more specific - I added some debugging code that by default didn't do anything. But it was still there; it checked a debug flag and didn't log anything if it was disabled. But that would take time to execute. Since that debugging code sat _between_ the routines doing math with the RX timestamp and the nexttbtt register, it would calculate a slightly larger TSF offset.

Once I moved the debug code out from where it is and grouped all that register access and math together, the slot timing swings dropped by a few microseconds and everything went back to smooth.

Tsk. I should've known better.

At least now the TDMA code is working well on the 802.11n chips. Yes, it's still only 802.11abg rates, but it works. I've also found the PCU MISC_MODE bit to enforce packets don't transmit outside of the burst window and that is working quite fine with TDMA.

So, I think I can say "mission accomplished." I'll tidy up a few more things and make sure TX only occurs in one data queue (as mentioned in my previous post, they all burst independently at the moment..) and then patiently wait for someone to implement 802.11n adhoc negotiation so 802.11n MCS rates and aggregation magically begins to work. Once that's done, 802.11n TDMA will become a reality.

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